Link

User Experience Videos That Are Worth Your Time (Re-blog)

9 Jan UX

User Experience Videos That Are Worth Your Time (Re-Blog)

Get a refresher course list (or learn new) – these are a great place to focus on UX-User Experience development..

Rub Link: User Experience Videos That Are Worth Your Time  http://bit.ly/1dheEMc

Get a refresher course list (or learn new) – these are a great place to focus on UX-User Experience development..
presenting here phenomenal videos and related resources on the topic of user experience (UX) by different presenters at different events. We have focused on current content but have included some older videos that are still relevant. It will take you more than 16 hours to watch all of these videos. So, make some popcorn, turn off the lights and enjoy.
http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2010/01/05/25-user-experience-videos-that-are-worth-your-time/

UX

BONUS! RUB PIC FOR> 32 UX Posts to Hit Your Conversion Targets

BONUS LINK: 32 UX Posts to Hit Your Conversion Targets http://bit.ly/1dhbIz2

Link

Stanford Magazine – Seeing at the Speed of Sound – March/April 2013

8 Mar

Re-posting Via~ Stanford Magazine – Seeing at the Speed of Sound – March/April 2013. & The uncertain dance of the spoken word « Mind Hacks | http://bit.ly/ZlQlE2 .

Stanford Magazine has a wonderful  article [ Seeing at the Speed of Sound ] by a writer who relies on lip-reading and experiences speech through this subtle movement-based language.

Seeing at the Speed of Sound

Lipreading, which makes one sense do the work of another, is a skill daunting to describe. Rachel Kolb, ’12, deaf since birth, shares its mysteries.

Rachel Kolb skilfully describes how this works, and more importantly, feels.

Stanford Magazine - Seeing at the Speed of Sound - March/April 2013

Rachel Kolb
Rachel Kolb, ’12, is a graduate student in English from Albuquerque, N.M., and a Stanford magazine intern.

The part where she describes how she experiences accents is just amazing:

Accents are a visible tang on people’s lips. Witnessing someone with an accent is like taking a sip of clear water only to find it tainted with something else. I startle and leap to attention. As I explore the strange taste, my brain puzzles itself trying to pinpoint exactly what it is and how I should respond. I dive into the unfamiliar contortions of the lips, trying to push my way to some intelligible meaning. Accented words pull against the gravity of my experience; like slime-glossed fish, they wriggle and leap out of my hands. Staring down at my fingers’ muddy residue, my only choice is to shrug and cast out my line again.

The full article is highly recommended. Both fascinating and wonderfully written.

Thanks original articles via~
Stanford Magazine – Seeing at the Speed of Sound – March/April 2013 | http://stanford.io/ZlQt6r
Mind Hacks – The uncertain dance of the spoken word| http://bit.ly/ZlQlE2